Are wedding china patterns and crystal collections things of the past?

Hector Manuel Sanchez

These days, the wedding industry is as trendy as it is traditional. While some things may never change (shout out to the ever-so-classic bridal portrait), others are open for interpretation. Want your bridesmaids to wear white? Why not. Eyeing a blush bridal gown? Try it on. Even the most traditional Southern bride isn’t immune to Pinterest-worthy style that may help her wedding stand out from the rest.   

The wedding registry has evolved, too. “Couples today want to have it all, from traditional home upgrades, like a blender and wine glasses, to experiences they can enjoy together, like a trip to Europe or their favorite concert,” says Jennifer Spector, a wedding expert at the popular wedding registry website Zola. A widespread wish list means a more varied wedding registry. From dinnerware to a honeymoon dinner, couples are including gifts that might appeal to different guests, setting the stage for a whole new take on registry etiquette. “A grandmother might want to gift you something different from your college roommates, for example,” Spector says.

What does this mean for the classics? Are couples simply counting on family heirlooms to set the Thanksgiving table or opting for more casual collections altogether?

WATCH: The Most Popular Wedding Registry Picks in Every Southern State

According to Zola, 1/3 of couples register for a fine china place setting, and that number has remained relatively consistent in recent years. Plus, when it comes to drinkware, couples still want crystal. Schott Zwiesel, Godinger, and Waterford are some of the most popular drinkware sets on their site – all classic crystal brands.

“The majority of couples live together before getting engaged so their registry is a great time to upgrade items they already have,” says Spector. Those upgrades often look like a KitchenAid Stand Mixer or a cast iron skillet (two of their most popular gifts in the South and nationwide), but it’s comforting to know that the classics aren’t off the table.

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