“All's well that ends well.”

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He's only a few days old, but a young colt named Bravo is already giving Corolla Wild Horse Fund (CWHF) herd managers a run for their money. Bravo, who was born Saturday afternoon, somehow managed to escape the next morning.

The North Carolina nonprofit recounted the scary few hours that followed on Facebook Monday.

Wild Horse Foal Bravo
Credit: Kristen Vreeland/Corolla Wild Horse Fund

"They gave us quite a scare Sunday morning when we went out to check on them," the post reads. "The adult horses were fine and behaving normally but there was no foal to be found. Cora Mae, the mother, was not acting stressed at all so we were quite stumped."

Staff scoured the surrounding area but couldn't find any sign of the foal. Then, after about three hours of frantic searching, they received word that the foal had been spotted "a couple streets and canals" south of his family.

"We rushed over and there was Bravo standing under a house," the post said.

Bravo was scooped up and returned to his family, where he was immediately accepted by his mama. According to the non-profit, it's "unlikely she rejected him and left him behind on purpose."

Their best guess is that Bravo got left behind in the chaos of a scuffle between some stallions Sunday night.  "He was far enough away from Cora Mae that she wouldn't have been able to smell or hear him, which was probably why she was behaving as if the foal was dead—as far as she knew, he was."

"Either way, all's well that ends well," the post concludes. "Bravo immediately nursed and is doing just fine now."

Bravo is the ninth foal born to the Outer Banks herd this year, bringing the total herd count to 105.

Welcome, Bravo! Please stay close from now on, little guy.