Fortunately, unlike The Gray Man, these creepy crustaceans aren’t a harbinger of death and destruction.

Meghan Overdeep
November 2, 2018
BaloOm Studios/Getty Images

It turns out that The Gray Man isn’t the only ghost who haunts the sandy shores of the Carolinas at night.

I’ve you’ve ever walked down the beach in the darkness and seen movement out of the corner of your eye or heard a “slight skittering noise,” chances are good you’ve had a run-in with the Atlantic ghost crab, another one of the Outer Banks’ ghoulish residents.

Fortunately, unlike The Gray Man, these creepy crustaceans aren’t a harbinger of death and destruction. But thanks to their translucent appearance and big beady eyes, Atlantic ghost crabs do have a habit of giving late-night beach-goers a bit of a fright. (Fear not, they’re essentially harmless.)

WATCH: “The Gray Man,” South Carolina Ghost Said to Warn Locals Before Hurricanes, Appears Ahead of Florence

“These elusive animals spend most of their days inside their burrows but come out after dark to search for food,” Cape Hatteras National Seashore explained via a Halloween-inspired Facebook post earlier this week. “They are omnivores and will eat both plants and animals, even other ghost crabs.”

Have you walked down the beach at night and seen movement out of the corner of your eye? Have you heard a slight...

Posted by Cape Hatteras National Seashore on Wednesday, October 31, 2018

According to OuterBanks.com, the best time to find ghost crabs is during the summer months, between late May and early September. To spot one in the wild, dress in dark clothes and carry a flashlight. Be quiet and head to less-trafficked areas for best results. And most importantly, don’t touch the little crabs.

“Whatever you do, don’t attempt to poke, prod, or pick up a ghost crab,” OuterBanks.com warns. “Although clearly not fatal, a ghost crab pinch can still be a little painful.”

Happy ghost (crab) hunting, y’all!