The years of Halloween falling on October 31 may be numbered!

Over the summer, the Halloween & Costume Association started a national petition asking that the White House move the annual holiday from October 31 to the last Saturday in the month.

The petition claims that moving the date would make the holiday “safer, longer, and stress-free” for parents and children.

Because many kids walk around without adult supervision and often in the dark, the petition suggests moving Halloween to a Saturday would help prevent some of the 3,800 Halloween-related injuries that occur each year.

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In addition to safety concerns, having the holiday on a weekend would help parents who are too busy with work during the weekdays to take their children out for candy.

“70% of parents don’t accompany their children trick-or-treating,” reads the petition. “You’re never too old to trick-or-treat! Grab a costume and take advantage of some good ol’ fashioned family bonding!”

Some parents also argued that moving it to a Saturday would prevent any stress they experience to get their children back home and into bed for school the next day.

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Since its creation in July, the petition has garnered over 34,000 signatures.

Halloween first began as an ancient tradition approximately 2,000 years ago, according to The History Channel. Since the eighth century, All Hallows Eve has been marked o the Oct. 31 so because of its long-standing history, some feel that moving the holiday would be disrespectful to the ancestors who started it so long ago.

If the petition were to go through, it would not be the first time a national holiday has moved its date to accommodate the general public.

George Washington’s birthday was originally celebrated on February 22 for more than a century (though records indicate he was born on Feb. 11) However, in 1968, Congress passed the Monday Holiday Law, which moved the commemorative date to the third Monday in February.

The law was put into effect so more people could observe the holiday with a three-day weekend, which was believed to bring more “substantial benefits” to the nation, according to the National Archives.

Labor Day was also previously changed, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. It originally was observed on September 5 but has since been moved to the first Monday in September.

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