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Luxury London lingerie shop Rigby & Peller had supplied unmentionables to the royal family since the 1900s.

Queen Elizabeth sacked her royal bra-fitter because the 82-year-old owner revealed royal secrets in a book last year.

Luxury London lingerie shop Rigby & Peller had supplied unmentionables to the royal family since the 1900s and has held the Royal Warrant (a mark of exclusive suppliers to the Royal Households) for 57 years.

June Kenton, amid tears, revealed to the Associated Press that her shop was stripped of its warrant last year after the release of "Storm in a D-cup" last March. The book discussed meetings with the Queen and other noted members of the royal family at Buckingham Palace.

Kenton insists that she didn't mean to divulge the royals' private information and that the references to her famous clients were incidental – not salacious.

“There's nothing in there that makes you think, 'Oh! That's naughty,' ” she said in the interview.

However, Kenton did write about how she gave Princess Diana's sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, swimwear posters to put in their rooms during their time in school while supplying Diana with lingerie.

WATCH: Queen Elizabeth's Bra-Fitter Speaks Out After Losing Royal Contract

She also wrote about meeting Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace – focusing on her nervousness and surprise entering the royal bedroom.

"We never, ever have discussions of what we see in the fitting room," she insisted. "That's between you and the customer."

She also discussed details regarding the Queen Mother’s encounters with Princess Margaret and their disagreements on hats, quoting the Queen Mother as saying “I pretend to listen to Margaret and then, once she has gone, I order what I want.”

Unfortunately, the move cost the company the title, Kenton believes. However, officials from the Buckingham Palace refused to comment on whether this was the cause. Officials told the AP they never comment on individual companies.

Kenton purchased the luxury brand back in 1982, telling AP she was extremely saddened by the news and unaware of the consequences the book would have.

There are currently around 800 companies that hold Royal Warrants, according to the Royal Warrant Holders Association.