Photo: Alison Miksch; Prop Styling: Buffy Hargett Miller; Food Styling: Torie Cox
Active Time:
15 Mins
Total Time:
30 Mins
Yield:
Serves 10 to 12

We turned a beloved breakfast hash into a fun finger food. If you can’t find Broccolini, use broccoli and finely cut the stems. More than likely you have seen fingerling potatoes at the market, and may have even bought some to roast with other root vegetables, or boil for use in a potato salad. But have you wondered just what is a fingerling potato? Is it the same thing as a new potato, or a new variety of potato? Here is a quick Fingerling 101: Fingerlings are not new potatoes, which are simply immature potatoes that get thinned out early in the season in order to make room for the rest of the potatoes to mature. New potatoes are merely the baby version of any potato a farmer grows. Little fingerlings, however, are their own variety of potato, though they often get confused with new potatoes because they're small. Fingerlings are elongated in shape, about the size of a finger, with a delicate skin that does not need to be peeled before cooking. Fingerlings have a firm texture that holds up well in cooking, so try them roasted whole or boiled.

How to Make It

Step 1

Preheat oven to 425°F. Drizzle potatoes with oil, and rub to coat. Sprinkle with pepper and 3/4 teaspoon of the salt. Spread in a single layer on a baking sheet, and bake until skins are slightly crispy and potatoes are tender when pierced, about 25 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, melt butter in a medium skillet over medium. Add bell peppers, Broccolini, and shallots, and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender-crisp, about 3 minutes. Stir in remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt. Slit each potato lengthwise. Gently push the ends toward the center to split them open, like miniature baked potatoes. Spoon about 2 teaspoons bell pepper mixture into each potato. Serve warm.