No dramatic renovations required.

By Perri Ormont Blumberg
March 22, 2020
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As the coronavirus pandemic spreads, many are working from home. Some may have home offices and others may have a cramped sliver of a dining room table, or even a spot on the couch. Having worked from home for a few years, here are my three best tips for making your work space more zen—regardless of how much work-time real estate you've got.

1. Invest in better lighting.

Preferably, you've already set up shop by a window so plenty of natural light spills into the room. Either way, I'm a fan of the energy-efficient "wellness lighting" brand, Brilli. I find the Wind Down warm lights ($16 for a two-pack) calming, but you might like the Charge Up collection to help perk up your energy levels. Even if you don't invest in new lightbulbs, you may want to consider moving a lamp from, say, your bedroom to your living room work area to improve your lighting situation, which in turn, may impact your mood and work day productivity. (No scientific studies to cite here, but I doubt Delia Owens penned Where the Crawdads Sing in fluorescent lighting or under the dim haze of 40 watts.)

2. Use pretty coasters that make you happy.

I get fancy-shmancy here and use coasters that once belonged to my grandparents with a beautiful floral design etched into them that most people would typically reserve for happy hour. But it makes me feel more official, and, why not give yourself something pretty to stare at between trips to the kitchen to refill your glass of water or of coffee mug? Bonus: Using a coaster as opposed to putting glasses or mugs directly on your desk significantly reduces the chance of a spilled water all over your keyboard situation, not that I'm speaking from personal experience or anything.

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3. Download f.lux.

Your hours may be slightly different when you work from home and/or you may spend more time hunched over a monitor throughout the day for virtual meetings. To help reduce your eyestrain, I love this free software that "makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day." The program makes sitting in front of your computer all day easier on your eyes, and I like that the orange-hued dimness that kicks in every evening serves as a visual reminder to wrap up the day and get offline.

Have you worked from home before? We'd love to hear from you: What are your best tips and tricks for making your home workspace more pleasing?