The one-hour film features never-before-seen video footage and previously unreleased audio interviews from the Queen's friends and private secretaries.
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Set your alarm for tonight, Monday August 31, at 9/8 p.m. central and prepare to set the channel to National Geographic: The network will be debuting a must-see documentary about Queen Elizabeth II. In Being The Queen, you'll get to know the longest reigning queen in world history (she's been at the helm of the United Kingdom for more than 25,000 days, if you're keeping track) like never before. The new documentary comes courtesy of Emmy and Peabody award-winning filmmaker Tom Jennings and is made in partnership with 1895 Films for National Geographic Partners. Tonight's airing takes place on the 23rd anniversary of the sudden death of Princess Diana on August 31, 1997 in a car crash in Paris.

The one-hour documentary—set to a musical score from Academy Award winner Hans Zimmer for Bleeding Fingers Music—will take viewers inside Lillitbet's world, tracing her reign from 1953 onwards, with previously unreleased audio interviews and video footage, along with rare photographs. Some highlights include rare radio broadcasts from the archives of the BBC and newly digitized unused interviews with friends, private secretaries, and confidantes, from Deborah Hart Strober and Gerald S. Strober’s 2002 biography, The Monarchy. Another standout moment in the documentary includes a home video filmed by Aberfan local resident Harry Breeze of the Queen’s visit to the Welsh village following the catastrophic coal mining disaster in 1966.

"I’ve gained exclusive access to untapped archives while piecing together the complete story of Queen Elizabeth II, which is most often underscored by love and marriage—from abdication, Princess Margaret, the late Diana, Princess of Wales, and Prince William and Harry,” said executive producer and director Jennings in a press release. “It’s my hope that when viewers witness the personal moments as The Queen leads her people through pivotal, historic occasions, they have a clear picture of the Monarch’s many fortunes and the struggles that shook her dynasty.”

Watch a clip from Being The Queen below of Lady Pamela Hicks, a cousin of Prince Philip, reflecting on the moment the Queen realized she would be a public figure for the rest of her life.

The film will be presented globally in 172 countries in 43 languages, so whether you've got royals-obsessed friends stateside, across the pond, or elsewhere, chances are, they'll be able to tune in for the documentary.

WATCH: Elizabeth Debicki Cast as Princess Diana for Final Two Seasons of The Crown

Who said Mondays aren't the best day of the week? Time to bake up some scones to make tonight's viewing session more festive.