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Keep an eye on your kids y’all!

Meghan Overdeep
February 1, 2018

Of all the infectious diseases out there, the flu is one of the hardest to miss. We all know the symptoms of the dreaded virus: coughing, sneezing, fever, and the overall feeling of being hit by an especially large truck. But as one mom recently pointed out on Facebook, there’s another common symptom of the flu that may be grossly overlooked.

In a now-viral post, Brodi Willard, a nurse, pointed out how hives—that itchy allergic rash we’ve all gotten at some point—could actually be a sign of the flu.

When Willard's son, Seb, recently came home from school with hives she tried everything to alleviate them. She changed his clothes, gave him baths, and pleaded with him to stop itching. After speaking with his pediatrician, Willard learned that other children had the same symptoms and tested positive for the flu. She would shocked when Seb too tested positive for Influenza B.

“He has had NO symptoms. No fever, no cough, and no runny nose. He only has hives,” Willard wrote alongside a photo of Seb showing off the bumpy red rash on his arm. “Please keep watch on your children so if they develop hives, please call your pediatrician. I have never heard of this symptom but it is obviously something to be on the lookout for.”

 

PLEASE READ AND SHARE: My son came home from school with hives. Every time he would scratch, more would appear. We tried...

Posted by Brodi Willard on Friday, January 26, 2018

Speaking with Today, Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, called the case "very, very odd." Skeptical, he shared the details with his colleagues who are flu experts.

“We’re all scratching our heads,” Schaffner added. “We’ve never heard of it before, so I think the answer is a strong maybe. It certainly is unusual.”

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Officially the jury is still out on this one, but if your child starts exhibiting hives, we think it’s best to heed Willard’s advice and consult a pediatrician.