It's one of 75,000 "branches" of the Little Free Library, and our new personal favorite.

By Perri Ormont Blumberg
January 14, 2019
John Crux Photography/Getty Images

Southern bookworms make pilgrimages to the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Gallery at the University of Georgia in Athens and the George Peabody Library in Baltimore, and even up north to Manhattan's famed New York Public Library Main Branch. Well, it's time to add another library to your must-visit list, this time in the small town of Coeur d'Alene. Idaho. With approximately 49,000 residents, the inviting hamlet is perched on the pristine Lake Coeur d'Alene. It's home to seasonal activities like sailing, movies in the park, and summer concerts, along with the annual Taste of Coeur d'Alene, Coeur d'Fondo, and plenty of other intriguing events. Now, it's also home to one of the most innovative Little Free Library outposts in the world.

Created by artist Sharalee Armitage Howard, the mini library is carved into an 110-year-old tree, that was rotting by Howard's home. After some renovating, it's part of the non-profit Little Free Library network, which supports and nourishes a love of reading at 75,0000 "branches" in 90 countries around the world. Since Howard shared a Facebook post of the work-in-progress in December, a photo of the library has received 102,000 shares on the social media network and counting.

Watch a video below to take a tour inside the centenarian tree and to get a peek around the library. How amazing does this sanctuary for book lovers look?

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Well, we guess it's time to pack up our dog-eared copies of The Color Purple and A Streetcar Named Desire and plan a trip Northwest.

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