“This is about being a voice for a building that can’t speak for itself and telling the tales of the folks who made it historic," says preservationist Kyle Kessler to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

By Perri Ormont Blumberg
August 2, 2019

Atlanta: Get ready to make way for Margaritaville.

Turns out, some Atlanta residents aren't okay with the new hotel coming to town, and there's a compelling reason behind their grievances. A brick building at 152 Nassau Street, which once served as the recording studio for Okeh Records, is slated to be demolished as Margaritaville builds its Atlanta resort.

Back in 1923, the building was where Fiddlin' John Carson recorded two songs — "Little Log Cabin in the Lane" and "The Old Hen Cackled."— that later paved the way for the genre of country music. Kyle Kessler, an architect and preservationist, is spearheading the movement to save this special building, with a change.org petition that has 8,655 signatures and counting.

Now, the one-time recording studio's fate may be sealed. "In the coming days, the building could be leveled after a Myrtle Beach-based developer acquired a demolition permit from the city earlier this month," wrote Jeremy Turley for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "In its place, the developer plans to build a 21-story, “Margaritaville”-themed hotel, timeshare rental, and restaurant in a nod to Jimmy Buffett’s 1977 hit song." In an update to the original piece, it is shared that demolition of the building's interior started on Tuesday. Kessler is still trying to mobilize social media in his efforts and convince the city to help save the historic site. 

“This is about being a voice for a building that can’t speak for itself and telling the tales of the folks who made it historic,” Kessler to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In his eyes, the space could be folded into the plans for the new hotel as a music venue or a gift shop. Apparently developers refused a similar plea from city officials.

Too bad Jimmy Buffett can't save the day and preserve history for generations to come.

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