Don’t be surprised if you’re prompted to tip on that delicious Bloody Mary.

By Meghan Overdeep
January 7, 2019
izusek/Getty Images

Frontier Airlines has made it easier for passengers to thank its flight attendants for good service. But not everybody is thrilled with the news.

Bloomberg reports that attendants working for the budget airline, which made headlines for pioneering its tip-your-attendant system in 2016, used to pool their tips on each flight. But now, as of January 1st, Frontier’s roughly 2,200 flight attendants will be pocketing their own gratuities garnered on in-flight purchases.

Like many airlines, Frontier utilizes a payment tablet, which solicits an option to tip after passengers swipe their credit cards in exchange for snacks, Bloody Mary’s, etc. The tablets prompt customers to tip 15%, 20%, 25% or a custom gratuity.

“We appreciate the great work of our flight attendants and know that our customers do as well, so [the payment tablet] gives passengers the option to tip,” Frontier spokesman Jonathan Freed told Bloomberg. “It’s entirely at the customer’s discretion, and many do it.”

The Denver-based airline is currently the only one that allows its attendants to solicit and accept tips, a move that has divided the travel industry. Henry Harteveldt, founder of Atmosphere Research Group, which analyzes the travel industry told Bloomberg that he doesn’t expect other airlines to follow Frontier’s lead.

“I think it’s just like in a restaurant and, frankly, not an image the airlines want to have,” he explained, adding that the new policy could also affect service levels on board.

WATCH: This Is The First Thing Flight Attendants Notice About Passengers

Attendants can also choose whether or not to trigger the tip option—so you might not see it each time you fly with Frontier.

“I've flown more than 350 flights on 51 different airlines in the past three years, but I'd never experienced an airline ask for a tip,” ThePointsGuys.com’s JT Genter wrote.

Fingers crossed this revolutionary step will improve service and supplement the incomes of the hardworking men and women of Frontier.

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