The 2022 Atlantic hurricane season will be the seventh above-average hurricane season in a row.
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Credit: NOAA

Another busy hurricane season is on its way.

NOAA's Climate Prediction Center released its forecast for the upcoming hurricane season today, and it looks like we're in for yet another doozy. Forecasters are predicting above-average hurricane activity this year, marking the seventh above-average hurricane season in a row.

NOAA's outlook for the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season—which lasts from June 1 to November 30—predicts a 65% chance of an above-normal season, a 25% chance of a near-normal season, and a 10% chance of a below-normal season.

Experts anticipate 14 to 21 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), with six to 10 becoming hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including three to six major hurricanes (winds of 111 mph or higher).

"Early preparation and understanding your risk are key to being hurricane resilient and climate-ready," Secretary of Commerce Gina M. Raimondo said in a news release. "Throughout the hurricane season, NOAA experts will work around-the-clock to provide early and accurate forecasts and warnings that communities in the path of storms can depend on to stay informed."

The 2021 season saw 21 named storms, the third highest on record, while 2020 had a record-breaking 30 named storms.

The Atlantic season has experienced an increase in destructive hurricanes over the past several decades. Scientists attribute this troubling trend to higher ocean temperatures from human-caused climate change.