Ever heard of an Arnold Palmer?

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The English language is always changing, which is why each year brings new additions to the dictionary. Wondering what words made it into the lexicon this year? You’re in luck, because Merriam-Webster has just released their latest list of newly included words and definitions, which you can browse here. In addition to technology terms (blockchain, cryptocurrency), metaphors (dumpster fire), and newly recognized verbs (mansplain), Merriam-Webster’s latest list includes quite a few culinary terms, which are making us want to break out our cookbooks and try some new recipes.

Of the 850 newly added words and definitions, we’re most intrigued by the assortment of food words that has made its way onto Merriam-Webster.com. There are two words on this list that Southerners, especially, will know and love. Ever heard of an Arnold Palmer? (Noun: “a cold beverage of iced tea mixed with lemonade”) What about queso? (Noun: “a dipping sauce of melted cheese and chopped chili pepper”) These are just two of the delicious recent additions; you can see the others—and quiz yourself—by browsing the sampling below. If you’re stumped by any of these food words, click through to their definitions on Merriam-Webster.com.

1. Aquafaba
2. Cotija
3. Harissa
4. Kombucha
5. Natto
6. Tzatziki
7. Unoaked
8. Za’atar

How many did you know? We have to admit, we needed the definitions for one or two, which is fortunate because they were just added to the dictionary! The dictionary expands every year, which is something to celebrate. “The one constant of a vibrant living language is change, and English has never been more alive than it is today,” says Peter Sokolowski, Editor at Large at Merriam-Webster.

For more information, you can visit Merriam-Webster.com, or follow @MerriamWebster on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

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What are your favorite food words? What other culinary terms do you think Merriam-Webster should add to the dictionary?