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We're Making A Case For The Not-So-Open Floor Plans

Despite all the walls knocked down on HGTV, it turns out there are some drawbacks to the wide-open floor plans that have been so popular lately. “There’s been a slow but steady change,” says Andrew Cogar. “The thought was that an open and informal plan would create a sense of ease, but people are realizing that it also means everything has to be organized or else the house can quickly feel cluttered. Closed-off rooms allow people to cut down on some of that visual noise. It may sound counterintuitive, but people are returning to separated spaces as a way of simplifying how they live on a daily basis.” Consider this update to one of our most popular and cover-worthy homes, featured in our June 2011 issue. After the story ran, we asked the architect—Rick Clanton of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina—to make his popular plan available through our Southern Living House Plans service. It quickly became one of our top sellers. Recently, he adapted the plan for 2018. It maintains the still-in-demand open kitchen/great room/dining concept but adds a study, a walk-in pantry, and a flex room off the kitchen. Clanton says, “Sometimes you want a place where you can close the door. Open space is good, but too much open space is not.” - Lucas Allen
Despite all the walls knocked down on HGTV, it turns out there are some drawbacks to the wide-open floor plans that have been so popular lately. “There’s been a slow but steady change,” says Andrew Cogar. “The thought was that an open and informal plan would create a sense of ease, but people are realizing that it also means everything has to be organized or else the house can quickly feel cluttered. Closed-off rooms allow people to cut down on some of that visual noise. It may sound counterintuitive, but people are returning to separated spaces as a way of simplifying how they live on a daily basis.” Consider this update to one of our most popular and cover-worthy homes, featured in our June 2011 issue. After the story ran, we asked the architect—Rick Clanton of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina—to make his popular plan available through our Southern Living House Plans service. It quickly became one of our top sellers. Recently, he adapted the plan for 2018. It maintains the still-in-demand open kitchen/great room/dining concept but adds a study, a walk-in pantry, and a flex room off the kitchen. Clanton says, “Sometimes you want a place where you can close the door. Open space is good, but too much open space is not.” Lucas Allen
Adding a window gives diners take-it-or-leave-it access to kitchen happenings.  - Lucas Allen
Adding a window gives diners take-it-or-leave-it access to kitchen happenings.  Lucas Allen
Rick Clanton, a principal architect of Group 3, designed this house plan for our not-so-open way of living in 2018. Check out the New Vintage Lowcountry (SL-1831) at houseplans.southernliving.com. - Southern Living
Rick Clanton, a principal architect of Group 3, designed this house plan for our not-so-open way of living in 2018. Check out the New Vintage Lowcountry (SL-1831) at houseplans.southernliving.com. Southern Living