The Martinique print certainly has a fascinating origin story.

By Perri Ormont Blumberg
April 2, 2019
Paul Quemper / EyeEm/Getty Images

Sure, Palm tree wallpaper is nice and all, but what could surpass the beauty of banana leaf wallpaper?

Little did we know, the vibrant green motif has an equally storied past. A recent article by Hannah Martin for Architectural Digest begins, "[b]ack from the Bahamas in 1941, Lucile and Remy Chatain Sr. of CW Stockwell textiles asked illustrator Albert Stockdale: Could he distill the island’s jungly land- scapes into a wallpaper? He could: The banana-leaf pattern Martinique, launched the next year, would soon be installed in CW Stockwell’s showroom—and featured in AD."

Fast forward to 1949 and the pattern was featured as the trademark flourish of the remodeled Beverly Hills Hotel. Now, it graces many areas of the property — from outdoor umbrellas to menu covers.

Indeed, the pretty print is said to hold some symbolism behind its wispy stalks. “It capitalized on the spirit that the war was newly over, and everyone was looking inward to their homes,” CW Stockwell’s current CEO, Katy Polsby, says in the Architectural Digest piece. This month, the company debuted platinum, navy, and sand-colored Martinique prints, available in both fabric and wallpaper. You can place an order or request a sample on CW Stockwell's website here.  

Of course, the design these days isn't limited to The Beverly Hills Hotel's hallowed walls. Now, you can spot the green leaves in homes across the country — not only on wallpaper and linens but also on mugs, table runners, as framed art prints, and more.

WATCH: Choosing & Hanging Wallpaper

You can't take a girl out of her Southern home, but you could definitely talk a girl into this festive and fun wallpaper or a set of new plates.

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