3 Simple Ways to Clean a Cloudy Glass Vase

For stem-worthy vases with minimal scrubbing.

If you've ever let the water go a bit too long in a floral arrangement, you know the mayhem of murkiness that stems and spare leaves can make in just a few days. Calcium deposits from hard water can also leave a fog. Even after you've disposed of the dirty water, the residue left inside a glass vase can be hard to scrub.

But cleaning a cloudy glass isn't just for your sanity. As much as a dirty vase in a tidy room can make you cringe, your flowers may actually be bothered even more by a vase with a layer of grime. Cut flowers are very sensitive to their environment, and starting flowers in a fresh, clean vase is just as important to their longevity as it is to maintaining your standards.

Luckily there are a few ways to make sure your glass vases are as clear as can be. Read on for three of our favorite ways to get rid of residue and cloudiness with ease.

Follow these guidelines to make tulips last in arrangements.
Choose blooms with tight petals. Open-petal blooms will have a shorter life.  Trim ½ inch off the bottom of stems, cutting them on a diagonal while underwater. Fill a vase with lukewarm water, mixed with a floral preservative packet. Switch out the water anytime it looks cloudy, or every three to four days. Tulips will lean toward light so rotate your vase every day to keep the flowers from drooping. Getty/ullstein bild

How Often to Clean a Glass Vase

Clean your vase every time you refresh the water and before you put it into storage. This will remove most bacteria and allow your flowers to stay fresh longer. Because flowers are so sensitive to any chemicals in the water, make sure to rinse out any salts and cleaning materials thoroughly before adding your flowers back into the vase.

Considerations Before Getting Started

If cleaning seems to have little or no effect on your vase, the cloudiness could be the result of etching, a deterioration of the glass that typically occurs in the dishwasher. Crystal vases are especially vulnerable to heat and detergents, especially in a household with soft water. Unfortunately, no amount of cleaning will remove a haze caused by tiny scratches and pits. The best way to avoid etching is to clean your vases by hand.

What You Need

  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Sponge, bottle brush, or old toothbrush
  • Warm water
  • Microfiber cloth
  • Salt, baking soda, or denture tablets

How to Clean a Glass Vase with Vinegar and Salt

  1. Mix together 1 tablespoon of salt with vinegar in a small bowl to make a paste.
  2. Rub the paste onto the inside of the vase using a sponge, bottle brush, or old toothbrush.
  3. Let it sit for 10 minutes before rinsing the paste off using warm water.
  4. Use a microfiber cloth to dry.

How to Clean a Glass Vase with Baking Soda and Vinegar

  1. Fill your vase with warm water, making sure any residue is submerged.
  2. Add 1 or 2 tablespoons of baking soda, depending on the size of the vase. Begin pouring in vinegar until the mixture gets a good fizz. Let it sit until the fizzing stops.
  3. Empty the vase and use a sponge, bottle brush, or old toothbrush to loosen up any grime that remains.
  4. Rinse with warm water.
  5. Use a microfiber cloth to dry.

How to Clean a Glass Vase with Denture Tablets

  1. Fill your vase with warm water, filling to the point that any residue is submerged.
  2. Drop in one or two denture tablets in the vase and let sit until fizzing stops.
  3. Empty the vase and use a sponge, bottle brush, or old toothbrush to loosen up any grime that remains.
  4. Rinse with warm water.
  5. Use a microfiber cloth to dry.
Posy Bouquet in Sparkling Clean Vase
Charles Walton IV

Tips to Keeping Your Vase Clean Longer

Residue from mineral deposits and bacteria will build up over time, making the haze that much harder to scrub away. Washing glass vases in the dishwasher can also cause the glass to cloud from etching. Clean your vase by hand with each and every use to help it stay sparkling.

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