Memphis, Jolene, Willie, Mary Grace, Pepper...it's going to be a tough decision to name our little leaves.

By Perri Ormont Blumberg
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1-800-Flowers.com Arrowhead Hanging Plant

These days, many of us are finding great comfort amidst the little things in life during the scary coronavirus pandemic. Whether it's writing in a journal or rereading a favorite book from childhood, there are many ways to add more joy to our days, even if we're not leaving our homes.

One of our favorite ways? Tending to houseplants. Research has suggested that houseplants and flowers may benefit both your mental and also your physical health, and we're totally onboard with the addition of anything pretty into our living space, to boot. To many living alone right now (and even those living with others), a houseplant can serve as a pet of sorts and truly give individuals a sense of accomplishment and happiness. Yet, many don't name their houseplants.

As Alfred Palomares, Vice President of Merchandising, 1-800-Flowers.com, explains to us, it may very well be time to give your houseplants a moniker. "Naming plants is a fun and healthy way of connecting with them. It further promotes an investment in plant care - as you watch your plants flourish, you have a sense of excitement, whereas if they aren’t doing so well—you may feel concern and tend to them more," says Palomares. "Giving plants a name also helps in talking to them, which can give any plant parent a sense of calm, especially during this time," he continues.

Palomares, as a proud plant dad, of course, practices what he preaches:  "I have 14 houseplants and call them the 'Shady Ladies,'" he tells Southern Living.  "My apartment gets a lot of indirect light, which is perfect for my group of houseplants that thrive in this type of environment. My plants also make working from home a much calmer, relaxing, and less lonely experience, while also adding beauty to the space," he elaborates. In addition to enhancing overall physical and mental well-being, Palomares also points to the fact that houseplants can purify the air, a boon for so many of us spending the bulk of our time at home these days. As Southerners, our wheels are already turning with Southern-inspired plant names. Memphis, Jolene, Willie, Mary Grace, Pepper...it's going to be a tough decision to name our little leaves.

To add or start your indoor houseplant collection, check out these selections from 1-800-Flowers.com:

Pilea Peperomiodes
Credit: Courtesy of 1-800-Flowers.com.

It may be hard to say this name ten times fast, but this plant is easy to care for. "This on-trend green plant is perfect for any desktop and also deemed our 1-800-Flowers.com 'Plant of the Year' for 2020!" notes Palomares. "It can be propagated to create offspring and requires bright, indirect sunlight."

This gorgeous indoor plant is pictured in the header photo above and we already want about ten in our homes. "One of the newest additions to the 1-800-Flowers.com plant collection, the Arrowhead Hanging Plant has textured leaves that prefers indirect sunlight, can tolerate low light, and won’t take up any counter or tabletop space," says Palomares.

1-800-Flowers.com Arrowhead Hanging Plant
Credit: Courtesy 1-800-Flowers.com

3. Snake Plant, $89.99

"Also known as the Sanseveria plant, it is available in a variety of sizes, is easy-to-care for, and prefers low-light environments," comments Palomares of this great addition to any living or bedroom space.

1-800-Flowers.com Classic Dendrobium Dish Garden
Credit: Courtesy of 1-800-Flowers.com

4. Orchids, from $34.99

Buy one of these stunning orchids and you won't be disappointed you did. "These long-lasting, colorful blooms are easy to water—just add an ice cube from the freezer once a week and enjoy," offers Palomares.

Monstera Deliciosa Floor Plant
Courtesy of 1-800-Flowers.com

Palomares likes this bold plant for its visual appeal and unique heart-shaped leaves. This houseplant thrives in bright, indirect sunlight.

WATCH: The Hidden Health Benefits of Indoor Plants

Plant parents among us: What houseplants are your favorites? Do you have any advice for plant care?

We're ready to get our minor league green thumb on and brighten up our space ASAP.