10 Designers Share the Biggest Interiors Trends of 2022

We approve.

New year, new you—and a new place to match? As we enter 2022, we can't help but wonder what the next 12 months will have in store. And, since we've been spending a lot of time at home, we're thinking about how to update our spaces with the latest trends. Though our personal quarters are meant to reflect our own aesthetics, staying up to date on the most recent fads can offer a breath of fresh air.

So, what's next for our homes? We asked 10 Southern designers for the trends that are poised to make it big in the new year. Though their responses run the gamut from moody hues to an antique revival, one thing's for sure: 2022 has all the makings to be one very stylish year.

Bathtub in Front of Window with Roman Shade
Catherine Nguyen

Chic Chocolate Hues

"We have been seeing a lot of clients embrace rich chocolate browns and lighter camel colors for their interiors," Zandy Gammons and Liles Dunnigan of Miretta Interiors in Raleigh, North Carolina. "This goes for paint as well as finishes and soft decor items like pillows and linens. These warmer tones feel more welcoming and are a backlash to the oversaturation of grays. People are over seeing interiors marked by light gray, dark gray, and more gray around every corner! We noticed that gray is the color of choice for nearly all quick build 'cookie cutter' new builds, so opting for a shade of chocolate browns feels more unique and custom."

2020 Idea House Main Bedroom with Canopy Bed and White Linens
Robbie Caponetto; Styling: Kendra Surface

Classic Canopy Beds

​​"I think canopy beds are really going to be having a moment in 2022," shares Atlanta-based designer Jared Hughes. "We are continuing to see major influences from historic and stately homes with the more maximal style of decorating that is classic but also of the moment."

Pictured: Southern Living 2020 Idea House main bedroom, designed by Lauren Liess. See more.

Green Room with Roman Shades and Large Windows
Sarah Stacey

Maximalism Marvel

"Trends always come in cycles and usually bounce in opposite directions," shares Texas-based designer Sarah Stacey. "Minimalism was so popular (and still is) for so long that maximalism is bound to continue to make a comeback. Maximalism is all about embracing 'extra'—be it a floral velvet, bullion fringe, or a 19th century French Commode. Or all three at once! I think richly hued palettes with layers of color and texture will take over in the new year. Texture like mohair, it is a luxurious fabric with a soft hand and makes for a gorgeous texture."

Large Kitchen Island with Bar Stools
Sarah Stacey

Dark Kitchens

"Kitchens have really changed in the last five years—and darker and moodier colors will become even more popular," Stacey adds. "You can really play around these shades in paint throughout the kitchen. I love leathered stones [such as] granites, marbles, and quartzites! The matte and slightly bumpy texture tends to hide messes, which is both a pro and a con! But it is great for people like me who don't necessarily want to clean their countertops all of the time. These materials are going to be increasingly popular in 2022."

Marble Top Vintage Table
Pamela King

Something Old, Something New

"I think that the trend for defining your home will lean more towards incorporating reworked vintage finds and heritage furnishings into the home, as well as incorporating more custom furniture pieces to make [your] home uniquely yours," shares designer Joy Williams, who splits her time between Georgia and Illinois. "Furniture that's made by local makers and has reasonable sourcing times. We plan to offer more custom pieces designed by our firm in the near future and add limited runs so that we maintain exclusivity for our clients who don't want to see their custom pieces floating around the internet.

Sitting Area with Large Window and Roman Shade
Haylei Smith

A Quiet Place

"I believe every home should have a Quiet Room, where introverts—and perhaps some extroverts—can retreat to process our day and recharge our internal batteries," shares Rachel Cannon, who has her eponymous firm in Baton Rouge. "Every day involves some level of recovery. While I've been preaching the need for a designated quiet room for a while, in 2022 we'll see this hybrid work scenario where people are split between working from home and going to an office. For an introvert, this makes us feel like we aren't firmly rooted in either place. The quiet room is what will continue to ground us and keep us working at our maximum performance. Simply carve out an area or room where you can quietly take time for yourself to read, draw, stitch, or simply be still and reflect. It's a healthy, powerful practice that allows you time to be more present for your family and continue to achieve your full potential."

Bar Nook with Geometric Backsplash
Michael Hunter

A Cozy Palette

"I'm finding that our clients are more apt to incorporate moody colors into their homes as opposed to stark whites," shares Dallas-based designer Traci Connell. "We're using aubergine, hunter green, black and warmer alternatives to white such as taupe, beige, and cream. These moody spaces feel a bit more expressive and are certainly cozier."

Walk-Through Pantry
Laura Negri Photography

Go For the Bold

"Darker, more saturated colors are going to be everywhere in 2022," shares designer Hope Austin. "Think wallcoverings and fabrics in bold blues and bright citrines paired with rich espresso and slate finishes."

Dark Gray Room with Collected Items on teh Wall
Mali Azima

Find Joy in the Everyday

"​​Utilitarian spaces are going to bring more joy in 2022," shares designer Kristin Kong. "Even though they will still have durable finishes and functional elements, mudrooms, laundry rooms, and sculleries are going to be places where beloved collections are displayed and enjoyed throughout the day. From humble to fine, today's collections only need to catch your eye, provoke a thought, or recall a memory to be worthy of an artful presentation."

Bright Throw Pillows on Bed with White Quilt
Elizabeth Day

Double Down on Details

"2022 is going to be a playful year," says Jenna Gross of Colordrunk Designs. "People want to have more fun at home, and they are willing to use bolder combinations of colors, patterns, and decorative elements than we have seen in years. Watch for interiors that are exuberant but sophisticated, where even small details like cabinet hardware and decorative trims add some 'wow' to a room."

Kitchen Breakfast Nook with Tall Windows
Laura Negri Photography

All About the Banquette

"You can bank on banquettes being hot in 2022," predicts Courtney Dickey of TS Adams Studio. "They are great space savers and create cozy nooks with plenty of seating for groups of various sizes."

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