How to Make a Fall Wreath with Dried Flowers and Herbs

A dried flower wreath can be a reflection of the season, decorating table, door, or wall. We've got some excellent tips on how to create this piece of charming home décor.

Fall Wreath with Dried Flowers and Herbs
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

Create a dazzling kaleidoscope of colors on your tabletop by mixing bunches of blooms and foliage in a rainbow of hues. The savory scents of the dried herbs will subtly enhance the aroma of a special meal.

Lend Meaning to Your Seasons

A dried flower wreath is a beautiful way to mark the seasons, not being limited to any holiday celebration or decoration. And perhaps the making of one for each season can be how your crafting goals shape up for the year.

The ancient practice of wreath-making originated in ancient Greece and Rome, with the citizens regularly making ring-shaped "wreaths" using fresh tree leaves, twigs, small fruits & flowers. Worn as headdresses, these wreaths represented one's occupation, rank, achievements, and status.

For this fragrant and nature-based exercise, try to think ahead and plan the gathering of your materials. Every time you step outside, it's an opportunity to shape the project.

What You'll Need

* Dried flowers and herbs (such aslavender, statice,sunflower, gomphrena, yarrow, sage, rosemary, tarragon, and bay leaves) picked and dried from your own garden, ordered online, or purchased from a crafts store

* Straw wreath form (Ours is 12 inches wide)

* U-shaped florist pins

* Hot-melt glue gun and glue

* Ribbon (if hanging)

Fall Wreath with Dried Flowers and Herbs
Laurey W. Glenn

How to Make a Dried Flower Wreath

Form small bunches composed of one flower or herb, and attach them in a row to the wreath form with U-shaped florist pins. Alternate the materials as you go for variety. Place each bunch so it slightly overlaps the previous one, and be sure to cover the sides. Continue until the entire form is covered.

Hot-glue a cluster of accent flowers on one side of the wreath to create a focal point. (We used three dried sunflowers with stems cut short.) Hot-glue more flowers and herbs in empty spots as needed. Add ribbon, if desired.

Take Care for Longer Use

If you display this wreath indoors and protect it from direct sunlight, it should last for two to three years. To clean the dried flowers and herbs, blow off dust with a cool hair dryer. Store it in a paper bag in a cool, dark place.

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