New Orleans Cottage Revival

Historic Structure
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

After their home was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, the Gentinetta family built a new cottage steeped in history.

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Historic Structure

Historic Structure
Laurey W. Glenn

Karina Gentinetta has an affinity for old houses, the older the better. When her newly purchased 1930s home—including nearly all its contents—was wiped out by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, she and husband Andrew "A.J." McAlear were left to build a new home on the lot where their old one had stood. "I wanted to pay homage to the architecture and history New Orleans lost," says Karina. Placing emphasis on simplicity, she drew the modest plans herself.

Feeling inspired? Build your own using our Cottage Revival house plan (SL-1946)

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Timeless Style

Timeless Style
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

Louvered shutters, corbels, and wood ceilings and flooring lend a historic feel to the exterior.

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Reclaimed Pieces

Reclaimed Pieces
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

A wooden chest, painted and then distressed, offers extra storage in the kitchen.

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Incorporated Treasures

Incorporated Treasures
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

Throughout the house, each piece of wood furniture has multiple coats of paint and an aged patina. Sky blue paint inside the secretary provides an element of surprise.

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Add Age with Patina

Add Age with Patina
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

The mirror that accents this wall wasn't completely man-made. It survived the flooding, but the water damaged the mercury on the mirror, giving it it's unusual sheen.

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Library

Library
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

The homeowners scoured the city for key architectural components, vintage furniture, and accessories, like this pale blue Swedish chest that sits in a niche in the bookshelves.

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Kitchen

Utilitarian Island
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

This kitchen was designed to be the biggest room in the house. There's no formal dining space except for the large farm table. And the industrial island offers a utilitarian twist to contrast with the room's old-world style.

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