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When we talk about our floors—be it good or bad—we’re usually talking the aging hardwood that clads the kitchen or the once-cushy carpet that coats our bedroom. Rarely do we talk about our garage. But this hardworking space deserves some recognition: It’s seen oil leaks, paint can spills, and has probably managed to weather more than its share of use.

Which means it might be time to pay those hardworking floors some attention.  

How To Prepare a Garage Floor for Painting

If you’re refreshing a floor that’s been neglected for a while, you’ll want to dish out a little TLC first. According to Behr, it’s important to not only sweep away debris and clean up any grease spills, but also to scrub the surface with a proper concrete cleaner. Once the surface is cleaned and rinsed, allow it to thoroughly dry before moving onto the next step.

Watch: What's the Best Color for Your Front Door?

How To Paint a Garage Floor

Just like your walls, garage floors need a primer. And not just any primer. Look for one specifically formulated for concrete or garage floors like Rust-Oleum, which is designed to coat previously painted or stained surfaces and eliminates the need for sanding or grinding. Apply primer with a regular paint roller and allow to fully dry before adding a topcoat.

As far as which type of paint is the proper topper for your garage floors, the answer depends on several factors. According to Car and Driver, most people typically choose between latex, acrylic, and epoxy paints. Each have their own benefits, with latex concrete floor paint (like Drylok) popular with beginners for its low price, easy prep, and solid coverage. Epoxy paints, on the other hand, tend to be a little more durable. While one-part epoxy paints are an option for the time-crunched, those wanting a job that’ll add years (or decades) to their garage floor’s pristine appearance should opt for a two-part epoxy kit. While pricier and requiring extra steps during prep and application, two-part epoxies are more resistant to flaking, chipping, and staining.

Now, who’s ready to give their garage the makeover it deserves?