When it comes to laundry pods, less equals more.
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Laundry pod washing gel in a washing machine.
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Whether we like it or not, we spend a great deal of time in our laundry rooms. Regardless of if your laundry room is technically the basement or conveniently located on the first floor, there always seems to be a load of whites to wash and a dryer full of towels to fold. 

Since the dirty clothes never stop, sometimes it's a simple solution that help us keep our laundry routines efficient. One helpful tool is the laundry pod. Tossing a pod inside your washing machine, selecting your preferred wash cycle, and pressing start sounds simple enough. However, if you're new to the pod game, you may not know exactly how many laundry pods you need to use per load.

We tapped, Matt Mottola, VP of Operations at Tedimatts, a laundry operator that customizes the shared laundry rooms within apartment buildings, condos, and dorms, for his expertise. According to Mottola, the company's service calls most frequently stem from oversudsing and overloading washing machines. Here's what you need to know about using one or two pods per load.

Is Your Washer High Efficiency?

One of the most important things to take into account is the style washer you are using. If you have a new washing machine model, there is a good chance that you have a high-efficiency washer. Simply put, a high-efficiency washing machine reduces the amount of water and energy required to complete a wash cycle. Owning a high-efficiency washing machine saves on your energy bill, but since it reduces the amount of water used, you'll quickly learn the less suds, the better. Try one pod with a high-efficiency machine.

If you own an older washing machine model or are not certain, Mottola recommends looking at the text on your washer provided by the manufacture or consult your owners manual to find out the efficiency status. 

How Many Pods to Use Per Load

For small to medium loads of laundry, Mottola recommends using one pod. For those hefty loads, even if your machine is high efficiency, he suggests trying two pods.

How to Use Laundry Pods

Unlike liquid laundry detergent, laundry pods go directly into the washer.  

"The pod should be placed directly in the drum of the machine, not in the detergent drawer where it can clog the water flow," Mottola explains.

The method sounds simple enough, but you may still find yourself with extra suds inside your washer's drum. Luckily, it's an easy fix, according to Mottola. "If you have used too much laundry detergent in the past and you notice oversudsing, we recommend running an empty cycle with a little bit of vinegar as a way to 'reset' your machine."