Bigger isn’t always better.

Hector Manuel Sanchez

The tiny house movement has taken over, and we aren’t opposed. Moving into a smaller home isn’t as big of a sacrifice as you might think. Sure, you’re scaling back on physical square footage, but you’ll be saving big in other areas. Eight hundred square feet may sound claustrophobic (especially if more than one full-time resident is planning on living there), but it’s actually the ideal amount of space for homeowners who are looking to downsize.

Downsizing to a smaller house is a practical, cost-efficient option, especially for retirees. Cutting back on square footage also means cutting back on the maintenance that goes into caring for a larger home, which can be both physically and financially taxing. Less upkeep means more time and funds for things like travel. Returning to a smaller home base between trips to visit family is a lot less overwhelming to manage. An 800-square-foot house is bigger than it sounds. A home this size can pack in two bedrooms, one bath, a kitchen, and a living space. So there’s still enough room to host supper club or overnight guests.

WATCH: Tiny Home Plans Under 1,000 Square Feet

Maximizing every inch of a cozy cottage will save it from feeling like a shoebox. Decluttering is key—prioritize the things you can’t live without and then get rid of the rest. Smart storage solutions will also save big on space, like sliding stackable laundry machines into a closet. Or keep cookbooks on open shelving so your collection can double as décor. Extending living areas outdoors can also help your home feel bigger, like centering an alfresco living room around a backyard patio.

Tiny houses aren’t for everyone. Prioritize the needs for your stage of life. A family with three kids? Hold off. Empty nesters? Call your restate agent.

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