The best part about this project is that it's great for growing outside – a wonderful do-it-yourself project for sunrooms or porches.

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When Ivy Odom, our Test Kitchen pro and star of Hey Y’all, was growing up in Moultrie, Georgia, her parents would grow real rye grass to fill in her Easter morning basket. The Easter Bunny would hop on over and leave a basket filled with sweet treats and surprises in a basket filled with fresh blades of grass. That is one of her most memorable traditions from the holiday (along with the Pineapple Casserole her family always made and enjoyed). Now that she is a grown up, she loves to revisit her family's holiday tradition in a modern way. Taking inspiration from her parents, she has decided to grow her own grass and use the baskets to decorate around her home. The project, which focuses on how-to grow rye grass is actually very easy to do. The best part about this activity is that it’s great for growing outside – a wonderful do-it-yourself project for sunrooms or porches.

What You Need:

Rye Seed

Plastic containers (we like recyclable milk jugs, bleach containers, old Tupperware)

Potting Soil

Watering container and water

Lots of Sunlight

Step-By-Step

Step 1: Choose your container. While actual plant pots or recycled containers work, Ivy likes to reuse containers. She mixes and matches all sorts of bottles and jugs in different sizes.

Step 2: Once you have your containers, fill each one with soil, leaving about an inch at the top.

Step 3: Sprinkle an even layer on the top of the soil with your rye grass seeds. Cover as much of the soil as possible, trying not to overlap too much. You can find rye seeds at your local garden store or center.

Step 4: Fill a watering can or jug with water. Water your pots generously. As Ivy mentions, you really want your containers to be soaking wet. Also, it is important to water these containers every day to two days.

Step 5: Place your containers in sunlight.

Step 6: While it will take about two weeks for your grass to grow to an ideal height, in just about two days, you will start to see those seeds sprouting.

Once your grass is finally grown, you will want to tuck the containers inside your favorite Easter baskets. Ivy loves pulling out her old family treasures (like her own Nana’s basket) and using them to decorate in her home. Nestle dyed eggs (like brights or blue and whites), sweet treats, or fun holiday knick-knacks in baskets.