18 Easter Egg Ideas That Are Oh-So-Cute and Easy

Pink and Orange Floral Fabric Wrapped Easter Eggs
Photo: Sara Albers

Although there's always room in our baskets for traditionally dyed eggs, this Easter we're showing off our creative side with some new Easter egg ideas. If you're ready to take a break from those traditional supermarket dye kits, listen up. We've collected some inexpensive, easy, and oh-so-cute ideas that can be recreated from the comfort of your own home. If you're ready to try out some different colors and patterns, then grab an extra carton, get the kids involved, and have a full-on DIY afternoon. From marbled eggs and speckled shells to marvelous mod podge and gilded gold, it's time to take your Easter egg-stravaganza to the next level. Here are 18 ideas for Easter egg coloring, just in time to welcome spring and give the Easter bunny something to truly ooh-and-awe at.

01 of 18

Paint Pen Eggs

Paint Pen Eggs
Laurey W. Glenn

All you need to make these simple Easter decorations are hard boiled eggs and a few white and metallic paint pens. Brown hen's eggs work best here, but you can have fun creating your own patterns and designs. If you're a little stuck on how to decorate, head on over to Pinterest for some inspiration.

02 of 18

Mod Podge Easter Eggs

Mod Podge Easter Eggs
Laurey W. Glenn

In the South, we love our decoupage. Water balloons, non-stick cooking spray, and a little Mod Podge come together to make these vibrant eggs, perfect for centerpieces and tabletop accents.

03 of 18

Golden Eggs

Gold Leaf Eggs
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

Turns out, you don't need a goose to lay the perfect golden egg. Just follow these six simple steps, and you'll have bright and shiny eggs to complete your Easter table setting.

04 of 18

Marbled Easter Eggs

Marbled Easter Eggs
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn; Styling: Buffy Hargett Miller

These marbleized eggs use one of our favorite beauty products: nail polish. To make, simply add room temperature water to a disposable plastic container and pour in a few drops of nail polish. Feel free to mix up different colors of polish (we used blue and white here) and swirl with a plastic fork. Drop in one egg and give it a swirl or two before lifting out and placing on your drying carton. Repeat with the remainder of your eggs, adding a few more drops of polish to the water as necessary between eggs.

05 of 18

Yarn-Wrapped Easter Eggs

Yarn Wrapped Easter Eggs
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn; Styling: Buffy Hargett Miller

Wrap your head around this clever approach to egg decorating. Instead of dyeing Easter eggs, why not use yarn as a colorful, budget-friendly alternative? Start with plastic Easter eggs in various sizes. Using a foam brush, apply a coat of Mod Podge to the top of the egg. Take the yarn and place the end at the very top of the egg, using your finger to hold it in place. Begin to wrap the string around the egg, making sure the string touches without overlapping as you go. Apply more Mod Podge as you work your way down the egg. Snip the end of the string once you reach the bottom of the egg. Apply a small dollop of Mod Podge to ensure the end of the string stays in place. Hold it with your finger for a minute or two until it’s secure.

06 of 18

Paper Mache Easter Eggs

Ribbon Wrapped Easter Eggs
Laurey W. Glenn

To make these paper mache eggs, start by tearing the paper into strips about an inch thick. Liberally coat the top of the egg in a layer of Mod Podge. We used a foam brush, but any brush will do. Start layering paper strips on top of the Mod Podge, tearing large strips to create smaller pieces as necessary. Overlap the strips so that every part of the top of the egg is covered. Fill in any holes with tiny pieces of paper. Once you're satisfied with your paper placement, coat the paper with another layer of Mod Podge. Allow the top to dry completely before fitting the bottom and top together. Tie the larger ribbon around the egg and knot. Finally, take the thin ribbon and wrap it around the egg, finishing it with a bow.

07 of 18

Eggshell Planters

Eggshell Planters
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn; Styling: Buffy Hargett Miller

Welcome spring with something green that will last beyond the Easter holiday. We use eggshells here to create our very own tiny planters, and believe it or not, this eggshell method is one of the best ways to start a seedling.

08 of 18

Chick Easter Eggs

Chick Easter Eggs
Southern Living

Trade in your usual dyed eggs for these cute peeps. Paint your hard boiled eggs with a sponge brush and some yellow paint. To help speed up the process, use a hairdryer to help dry up some of the paint. Once the egg is totally covered in yellow paint and dried, cut triangles out of orange washi tape. Draw on the eyes with a marker. Cut off the tips of yellow feathers and glue the tufts to the top of the egg.

09 of 18

Chinoiserie Eggs

Blue and White Chinoiserie Easter Eggs
Melissa Fenlon

If you're looking for a batch of homemade eggs to match your whimsical Blue Willow china, then this DIY egg design is for you. Start by cutting out floral shapes from your paper napkins. Separate the two-ply napkins and just use the top layer for this project. Brush a thin layer of matte Mod Podge onto the section of egg you are starting with. We like having space between the floral napkin cut outs, rather than wrapping the egg with one big piece of the napkin. Place the cut out napkin piece on the Mod Podge and smooth out with your finger. Then brush on a thin layer of Mod Podge. Repeat these steps until your egg is covered with your pattern. Let dry.

10 of 18

Floral Fabric Easter Eggs

Pink and Orange Floral Fabric Wrapped Easter Eggs
Sara Albers

We can hardly wait to add these colorful egg bundles to our Easter tables. You too? Just pick your favorite fabric pattern, grab some Mod Podge and get to work!

11 of 18

Speckled Dyed Eggs Using Rice

rice Easter egg decorating
Southern Living

Rice is most definitely a favorite starch among Southerners, and it just moved even higher on our list with this DIY egg decorating tip. If you are looking for a speckled Robin's Egg look, rice will be your best friend. Just be sure to dye your egg a solid color first if you are looking for a brightly pigmented egg.

12 of 18

Marbled Whip Cream Eggs

Cool Whip Eggs
Southern Living

You already know the basics of egg dying, but did you know that you can create a marbled effect by pulling out that tub of whipped cream you have in your fridge? Yes! It is THAT easy and fun!

13 of 18

Blueberry-Dyed Easter Eggs

Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs
Photo: Laurey W. Glenn

You love them in muffins, but you will love them even more for their natural dye. Long before blueberries became a go-to snack, they were used for their deep pigmented juices, which can be a natural dye.

14 of 18

Beet- and Onion-Dyed Eggs

Natural Easter Eggs
Southern Living

There's no question that beets can be a powerful stain for vibrant Easter eggs, but did you know that yellow onions can also be used to dye eggs? Yes, they can. For Springy pink and orange eggs that speak to the season, all you need is a stroll down the produce aisle.

15 of 18

Baking Soda Eggs

Baking Soda Eggs
Southern Living

Get the kids involved in this family-friendly egg dying technique that will make you feel like you're completing an elaborate science experiment. If you want to create a unique pattern on your eggs, decorate them with some glue about an hour before you dye them. It adds a unique touch that detailed-oriented guests will notice.

16 of 18

Gold Speckled Easter Eggs

Gold Speckled Easter Eggs in Basket
Rachael Walker

If you want just a touch of shine on your formal lunch table, these eggs are sure to fit the bill. You'll need a push-pin, a toothbrush and some other supplies that you probably already have to put these elegant eggs together.

17 of 18

Painted Vine Easter Eggs

Easter Eggs
Photo: Helen Norman

The secret to the best color? Rit dye! You can even mix dyes to get custom colors. Once dry, hand-paint vine and flower designs on your eggs using a fine-tip art brush and water-based gouache paint. Hand-letter initials on some eggs to use as place cards.

18 of 18

Kool-Aid Dyed Eggs

Easter Eggs
Tetra Images / Getty Images

Did you procrastinate on buying the egg dying kit? Well, if you can't seem to find traditional dyes anywhere, head over to the juice aisle and pick up a few packets of Kool-Aid powder. It's even easier than the vinegar method.

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