Step aside, peach cobbler hair.

@colour.jade

Southerners take their bourbon quite seriously. We like to say that the only way to drink it is straight up. More lenient types will say on the rocks or with a splash of water. But catch us in a moment of weakness, and we'll cave: "Bourbon sweet tea? Sure, I'll take one." And before you know it, even Uncle Hank—a self-proclaimed bourbon connoisseur—is pinkies up, two glasses deep, and loving every slurp.

Now when we heard there was a hair color trend inspired by this classic Southern sipper, we couldn't help but wonder: First came blackberry pie hair. Then came peach cobbler hair. Now…bourbon sweet tea hair?

Is it just us, or is the beauty world just a tad obsessed with the South? We get it, guys. We're pretty cool. But our heads are growing bigger by the second.

This summer hair color is all about embracing warm tones, from rich brown to caramel to honey. Imagine a glass of Southern sweet tea, perfectly brewed and iced down hard. (Which, to be clear, means it should look the color of translucent honey. For folks who don't know.)

Then, bring in the molten amber color of Kentucky bourbon. Now blend those shades until you've got a swirl of brilliant brown color. That's bourbon sweet tea hair. You know, done by a hair stylist and not your Aunt Betsy with a cocktail shaker.

The trend was coined by celebrity stylist Guy Tang who explained the color as "a great way to refresh your strands and add a subtle twist," as reported by PureWow.

Summer is when most clients come in asking for warmer tones, and this is just the spirited way to do it. (Get it?) Colorist Jade Federico dubbed her version "painted amber."

And just like real bourbon sweet tea, you can customize to what you like. Just a splash, a full jigger, or perhaps a generous douse? Bartender's choice. Sit back, relax, and let this sunlit amber brown color see you through until summer's end.

WATCH: Spiked Arnold Palmer Recipe

You're more of an Arnold Palmer type of woman? We've got a recipe for that, too.

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