And the unsuspecting fall spice that can be poison for your dog.

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Chances are that, when meal time rolls around, your dog knows just where to place himself to be in the food-dropping zone. With lots of guests, conversation, and food being passed around, Thanksgiving dinner is a prime time for dogs to gobble up our leftovers. Sometimes it’s an accident—say, when Grandpa Bill drops a serving of mashed potatoes on the floor—and the dogs get the meal of their lives. But we’re all guilty of sneaking a little taste under the table for the dog. It can be oh-so-hard to resist those dreamy puppy eyes.

While some people foods can be a nice treat for dogs, there are certain foods that will do more harm than good. This Thanksgiving, there’s one culprit to be wary of: pumpkin pie.

Can Dog's Have Pumpkin Pie? 

Let me first say that pumpkin puree can actually be very good for your dog. It’s a great source of fiber and helps with their digestion. Once the canned pumpkin gets combined with lots of cream and sugar, though, things don’t look so good for your dog's stomach anymore. In fact, one fall spice can be toxic for dogs.

Do not feed your dog nutmeg. PetMD quotes veterinarian Stephanie Liff, DVM: “Nutmeg is toxic to pets due to a compound in the nutmeg called Myristicin… At high doses, you can see disorientation, hallucinations, increased heart rate and blood pressure, dry mouth, abdominal pain, and even seizures.

If your dog has already gobbled down a slice of pie, don’t worry just yet. While your pet may have some stomach problems, only large doses of nutmeg should trigger an extreme reaction. But if you find your dog on the pantry floor covered in brown dust with a half-chewed nutmeg shaker discarded beside him, get your pup to the vet ASAP.

WATCH: Homemade Dog Treats

So if you have some pumpkin puree leftover when you’re baking the pie, spoon a few tablespoons into your dog’s food bowl. But don’t feed your dog a slice of pumpkin pie, and definitely don't feed your dog any nutmeg.

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