JULIAN SIMMONDS/AFP/Getty Images

It’s never too late to start gardening. 

The ladies of the British royal family have quite the green thumbs!

Recent reports suggest that Queen Elizabeth, who toured the Chelsea Flower Show on Monday, has developed a renewed interest in gardening at the age of 91. Visitors couldn’t help but notice that the Queen was especially animated during her tour of the world-famous flower show.

According to the Telegraph, her royal highness was inspired by a recent garden restoration project at Windsor Castle, and has since developed an impressive knowledge about plants.

Robert Hillier, chairman of Hillier Nurseries, told the Telegraph that he was surprised by her sudden interest and in-depth knowledge of the subject. “She has never shown her knowledge before,” he said. “We have met many times but suddenly she is so interested in plants and planting.”

“She obviously enjoys going to Chelsea, but in the past she has not been so animated,” he added. “She has got really into gardening. It’s never too late!”

Lady Elizabeth Anson, who has been overseeing the garden restoration at Frogmore House at Windsor Castle, said: “Her knowledge of plants is phenomenal—and she knows the Latin names.”

In fact, the Queen is so invested in the grounds, that members of the gardening team are reportedly not allowed to remove a single tree or shrub without her permission.

The Duchess of Cambridge seems to be taking a page out of the monarch’s book, and recently told BBC Radio 2 host Chris Evans that she’s “just getting into gardening with the children."

Kate and her family are proud owners of an extensive kitchen garden at Anmer Hall, their country home in Norfolk, where they grow all sorts of vegetables and keep five chickens.Embed from Getty Images

 

The Duchess also revealed that she has had to teach Prince George how to identify what is and isn’t safe to eat, like fox gloves, for example, which are poisonous.

WATCH: Grumpy's Tips For Beginning Gardeners

It’s been a labor of love for the young family, but the taste, Middleton says, makes it all worth it. "It makes such a difference when you take it from the ground," she said.