SWISS CHARD

FAMILY: Chenopodiaceae

TYPE
  • Annuals
  • Biennials
SUN EXPOSURE
  • Full Sun
  • Partial Shade
WATER
  • Regular Water
PLANTING ZONES
  • US (Upper South) / Zone 6
  • MS (Middle South) / Zone 7
  • LS (Lower South) / Zone 8
  • CS (Coastal South) / Zone 9
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 10
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 11

Plant Details

A form of beet (Beta vulgaris) grown for its tasty leaves and stalks, this is one of the easiest vegetables for the home garden. It probably originated in the Mediterranean. New leaves grow up from the center of plants, continue for months, and seldom bolt (go to seed). They're delicious eaten fresh in salads or steamed.

Fordhook Giant', a heavy-yielding selection with white stalks and crinkled green leaves, is the standard Swiss chard. For something more colorful, try 'Rhubarb' or 'Vulcan'; both sport blood-red stalks. 'Bright Lights', with stalks of yellow, orange, pink, purple, white, and red, is as good an ornamental as it is a vegetable. 'Peppermint' has pink-and-white striped stems.

All Swiss chards take about 60 days from sowing to harvest.For a summer crop, sow the big, crinkly, tan seeds 12 to 34 inches deep at any time from early spring to early summer. For a fall crop, sow in early August. For a winter crop in the Coastal and Tropical South, sow in October. Sow about six seeds per foot in rows 1122 feet apart. Thin seedlings to 1 feet apart. Apply a complete fertilizer after plants are established. About two months after sowing (when plants are generally 1112 feet tall), you can begin to harvest leaves from the base by cutting or breaking them off.

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