Sweet Flag

FAMILY: Acoraceae | GENUS: ACORUS

TYPE
  • Perennials
SUN EXPOSURE
  • Partial Shade
WATER
  • Ample Water
PLANTING ZONES
  • US (Upper South) / Zone 6
  • MS (Middle South) / Zone 7
  • LS (Lower South) / Zone 8
  • CS (Coastal South) / Zone 9

Plant Details

Sweet flags look like small ornamental grasses, but they're actually related to calla (Zantedeschia). Grown for highly attractive foliage. Use in damp borders, at pond edges, in shallow water, or average garden soil. Propagate by dividing clumps in spring or fall.

sweet flag

acorus calamus

  • Native to the Northern Hemisphere.
  • Sword-shaped leaves resembling those of bearded iris are 1 inches wide, 45 feet long, growing in a clump about 2 feet wide.
  • Foliage is fragrant when bruised, as are the thick rhizomes.
  • Variegatus has very showy white-edged leaves.
  • Dies to the ground in winter.

japanese sweet flag

acorus gramineus

  • Native to Japan, China.
  • A trouble-free plant that prefers moist, fertile soil, either boggy or well drained.
  • Fans of narrow, 6- to 12 inches-long semievergreen leaves rise from the ends of slowly creeping rhizomes; the plant eventually forms a rounded clump.
  • Excellent for massing, combining with coarser-leafed plants, or growing in containers.
  • Ogon is especially showy, with arching golden yellow leaves to 10 inches long; it looks great beside dark green, burgundy, or purplish foliage.
  • Variegatus has white-striped green leaves; leaves of 'Licorice' are 112 feet long, with fragrance and flavor of licorice.
  • Dwarf Acorus g.
  • pusillus, 35 inches high, and lime-green 'Minimus Aureus', 23 inches high, spread very slowly and are useful between stepping stones or tucked into niches in a rock garden.

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