OKRA

FAMILY: Malvaceae

SUN EXPOSURE
  • Full Sun
WATER
  • Regular Water
PLANTING ZONES
  • US (Upper South) / Zone 6
  • MS (Middle South) / Zone 7
  • LS (Lower South) / Zone 8
  • CS (Coastal South) / Zone 9
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 10
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 11

Plant Details

Vegetable gardeners can't claim to be truly Southern unless they've grown okra. Native to tropical Asia, this vegetable (known botanically as Abelmoschus esculentus) arrived aboard slave ships from Africa in the 1600s and quickly became a regional staple. It's a large, erect, bushy plant to 6 ft. or taller, with big, bold, deeply lobed leaves. The edible seedpods are produced in leaf joints and can be pickled, fried in batter, or used in stews, gumbos, and soups.

Okra loves hot weather, so don't plant it until the soil has warmed to at least 75F. To speed germination, soak the hard seeds in water overnight before planting; use only those that are swollen. Work 12 cup of 10-10-10 fertilizer per 10 ft. of row into the soil. Sow seeds 121 in. deep and about 2 in. apart in rows 34 ft. apart. When seedlings reach 2 in. tall, thin them to 612 in. apart. After the first pods set, apply 14 cup of 10-10-10 fertilizer per 10 ft. of row; repeat three to four weeks later.

Allow 48 to 60 days from planting to harvest. Developing pods grow quickly, as much as an inch per day in hot weather; begin harvesting them when they are 24 in. long, and be sure to pick every couple of days (plants stop producing if pods are left to mature fully). Pods longer than 4 in. are typically too tough to eat. Use a sharp knife or pruners to remove the pods from the stemsand wear gloves, since okra pods are usually prickly.

For small gardens, try a dwarf form that reaches only 34 ft. tall, such as 'Annie Oakley II' (48 days), 'Baby Bubba' (53 days), 'Cajun Delight' (50 days), or 'Lee' (50 days). Despite their smaller size, these are heavy producers. 'Clemson Spineless' (56 days), the old standby, grows 56 ft. tall; its pods lack prickles.

Some selections have pods that remain tender even when they reach large size. 'Burgundy' (49 days) features maroon-red pods (green when cooked) that stay tender to 8 in. long. 'Burmese' (58 days) an heirloom from Burma, produces pods when only 18 in. tall amid oversize foliage and continues until frost. 'Cow Horn' (55 days), a Southern heirloom, grows 78 ft. tall and produces tender pods 10 in. long. 'Hill Country Red' (64 days) is a Texas heirloom. Red stems yield red-tipped pods still tender at 6 in. 'Jade' (55 days) grows to 412 ft. tall, bears tender pods to 6 in. long.

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