FREESIA

FAMILY: Iridaceae

TYPE
  • Corms
SUN EXPOSURE
  • Full Sun
  • Partial Shade
WATER
  • Regular Water
PLANTING ZONES
  • CS (Coastal South) / Zone 9
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 10
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 11
SPECIAL FEATURES
  • House Plants

Plant Details

South African natives prized for the rich perfume of flowers. In spring, wiry, 1- to 1 feet stems bear spikes of tubular flowers that reach 2 inches long and flare to 2 inches wide. Each stem bends at nearly a right angle just beneath the lowest bud. Narrow, sword-shaped leaves to 1 feet tall grow in iris-like fans. Hardy to 20F.

The old-fashioned favorite Freesia lactea (F. alba) has white blooms with a powerfully sweet scent, but more commonly available today are hybrids (Dutch and Tecolote hybrids represent the majority of those sold) with single or double blossoms in yellow, orange, red, pink, lavender, purple, blue, and white. You can buy mixed-color assortments as well as named varieties in specific colors.

Plant in fall, setting corms 2 inches deep (pointed end up) and 2 inches apart in well-drained soil. Plants go dormant after bloom and need no irrigation until growth resumes in fall. In areas with high summer rainfall, it's best to dig them when foliage yellows and store the corms until it's time to replant in early fall. Freesias will self-sow if faded flowers are not removed; volunteers tend to revert to cream marked with purple and yellow. In Upper, Middle, and Lower South, plant 2 inches deep, 2 inches apart in pots and grow indoors in a sunny window. Keep room temperature as cool as possible at night. Freesias are easily grown from seed sown in July or August; they will often bloom the following spring. Flowering potted freesias grown from chilled and stored corms are available throughout the year.

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