AMARANTH

FAMILY: Amaranthaceae | GENUS: AMARANTHUS

TYPE
  • Annuals
SUN EXPOSURE
  • Full Sun
  • Partial Shade
WATER
  • Regular Water
PLANTING ZONES
  • US (Upper South) / Zone 6
  • MS (Middle South) / Zone 7
  • LS (Lower South) / Zone 8
  • CS (Coastal South) / Zone 9
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 10
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 11

Plant Details

Sometimes coarse weedy plants, but a few ornamental kinds are grown for colorful foliage or flowers. Sow seed in place in early summer; soil temperature must be above 70F for germination. When young and tender, leaves and stems of many species (even some of the weedy ones) can be cooked like spinach in hot weather. Blooms appear in late summer and fall. In some species, seeds look like sesame seeds; they are high in protein and can be used as a grain.

love-lies-bleeding, tassel flower

amaranthus caudatus

  • A sturdy, branching plant 38 feet high, 13 feet wide.
  • The light green leaves reach 10 inches long, 4 inches wide.
  • Red flowers become drooping, tassel-like clusters.
  • More a curiosity than a pretty plant, it does produce grain.

prince's feather

amaranthus hypochondriacus

  • To 5 feet high, 2 feet wide, usually with reddish leaves 16 inches long and 123 inches wide.
  • Red or brownish red flowers in many-branched clusters.
  • Some strains are grown as a spinach substitute or for grain.

joseph's coat

amaranthus tricolor

  • Branching plant 14 feet high, 11 feet wide.
  • Leaves 26 inches long, 24 inches wide, blotched in shades of red and green.
  • Early Splendor, 'Flaming Fountain', and 'Molten Fire' bear masses of yellow to scarlet foliage at tops of main stems and principal branches.
  • Green-leafed strains are used as a spinach substitute under the name tampala.

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