AFRICAN DAISY, CAPE MARIGOLD

FAMILY: Asteraceae | GENUS: DIMORPHOTHECA

TYPE
  • Annuals
SUN EXPOSURE
  • Full Sun
WATER
  • Moderate Water
PLANTING ZONES
  • US (Upper South) / Zone 6
  • MS (Middle South) / Zone 7
  • LS (Lower South) / Zone 8
  • CS (Coastal South) / Zone 9
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 10
  • TS (Tropical South) / Zone 11

Plant Details

Cheery, free-blooming South African natives with daisy flowers that close when shaded, during heavy overcast, and at night. Use in broad massesas ground cover, in borders and parking strips, along rural roadsides, as filler among low shrubs. Broadcast seed where plants are to grow; sow in early spring (or in late fall or winter, in mildest climates). Do best in light soil. For other plants known as African daisy, see Arctotis and Osteospermum.

D. ecklonis. See Osteospermum ecklonis

D. fruticosa. See Osteospermum fruticosum

D. pluvialis. Branched stems 416 in. high. Leaves to 3 in. long, 1 in. wide, coarsely toothed. Yellow-centered, 1- to 2-in.-wide flower heads with rays that are white above, violet or purple beneath. 'Glistening White', a dwarf form with 4-in.-wide flowers, is especially desirable.

D. sinuata. Best known of annual African daisies. To 412 in. high. Narrow, 2- to 3-in.-long leaves with a few teeth or shallow cuts. Flowers 1 in. wide, with orange-yellow rays that are sometimes deep violet at the base; centers are yellow or dark with flecks of yellow. Hybrids between this species and D. pluvialis come in white and shades of yellow and light orange, often with contrasting dark centers.

In north Florida, grow this species as a summer annual. In central and south Florida, it can also be grown as a winter annual, but it's susceptible to soil-borne diseases that make it short lived there. Not bothered by deer.

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