Lane Thomas Foundation

Walt Disney World is cracking down its least desirable guests.

Meghan Overdeep
November 2, 2017

Walt Disney World is cracking down its least desirable guests. According to News 6 Orlando, the number of alligators captured on Disney World property has more than doubled since two-year-old Lane Thomas Graves was killed by an alligator at the resort in June of last year.

State records show that in the 15 months leading up to Graves’ death, wildlife trappers removed 45 alligators from the property. In the 15 months following that unspeakable tragedy, however, at least 95 alligators were captured—which means Disney World officials more than doubled their efforts to control the number of reptiles on park grounds.

WATCH: This Charity is Helping Kids with Cancer Look Like Disney Princesses

“In keeping with our strong commitment to safety, we continue to reinforce procedures related to reporting sightings and interactions with wildlife, and work closely with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to remove or relocate certain wildlife from our property in accordance with state regulations,” a Walt Disney World spokesperson told News 6.

Disney reportedly received a special permit from The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to allow them to exceed state limits and remove alligators from its waters in response to Graves’ death.

And that’s not all the beloved theme park has done. This summer Disney World erected a gold and blue lighthouse sculpture at Seven Seas Lagoon—the spot where Graves died while building sandcastles on the beach. Disney also added signs and additional fencing around the park’s various bodies of water. The boy’s family established The Lane Thomas Foundation, which supports families in times of crisis.