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The National Park Service is considering raising rates at 17 of the country’s most cherished parks including Grand Canyon, Yosemite, and Yellowstone.

Meghan Overdeep
October 26, 2017

Come 2018 it could be a lot more expensive to visit America’s most beautiful places. An entrance fee hike proposed by the National Park Service would more than double the cost of experiencing the nation’s most popular national parks.

NPS is considering raising rates at 17 of the country’s most cherished parks including Grand Canyon, Yosemite, and Yellowstone in order to pay for infrastructure improvements. Under the agency's proposal, the entrance fee for a private vehicle would increase from its current rate of $25 - $30 to $70 during peak season, while the cost for motorcycles would jump to $50, from the current fee of $15 to $25. The cost for people entering the park on foot or on bike could go from $10 - $15 up to $30. Some good news: the cost of the annual pass, which allows entrance into all federal lands and parks, would remain at $80.

The proposal would affect the following 17 national parks during the 2018 peak season:

  • Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska
  • Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
  • Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
  • Sequoia National Park, California
  • Kings Canyon National Park, California
  • Yosemite National Park, California
  • Joshua Tree National Park, California
  • Acadia National Park, Maine
  • Glacier National Park, Montana
  • Zion National Park, Utah
  • Arches National Park, Utah
  • Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah
  • Canyonlands National Park, Utah
  • Shenandoah National Park, Virginia
  • Mount Rainier National Park, Washington
  • Olympic National Park, Washington
  • Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
  • Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

 

WATCH: South's Best National Parks

Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountains National Park—the most popular of the nation’s parks, with 11,312,786 million visitors in 2016 alone—is not set to experience a rate increase.

The National Park service has opened the proposal to public comments for 30 days at its website.