This Alabama grandmother happened to be a perfect match and the miracle her granddaughter needed.

Having a critically ill child is one of the worst things a family could face. Parents are left feeling helpless as they watch their child suffer. It’s a feeling two-year-old Wryn Graydon’s parents Michael and Haley understand.

At just two months of age, Wryn was diagnosed with a rare kidney disorder called congenital nephrotic syndrome. The National Institutes of Health cite that this disease is primarily caused by genetic defects and usually presents itself just after birth.

Two months after her diagnosis, baby Wryn had both of her kidneys removed, reported ABC News. Without either kidney, Wryn had to be on dialysis at home as the family waited for her to be old enough and strong enough for a transplant.

The Graydon family hoped they would be able to find a match within their family, as that is the best-case scenario for Wryn. As dad, Michael Graydon, told ABC, they didn’t even have to ask their family members. Everyone wanted to be the match.

“My wife and I didn’t know who to choose to get tested first. I had kidney stones so I knew I wouldn’t be a possibility and my wife was the primary caregiver, so they wouldn’t let her do it.”

Thankfully they didn’t have to look much further because Wryn’s GiGi was a perfect match. Michael’s mother, Carol Graydon, did not hesitate to go under the knife and give her granddaughter the ultimate gift. According to Wryn’s doctor, Dr. Dan Feig, division director of Pediatric Nephrology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Carol has the kidneys of a 20 year old.

“A very, very healthy 62-year-old is terrific so we were thrilled to be able to move forward,” Feig told ABC.

Wryn couldn’t have surgery until she was one year old and weighed 10 kilos. She didn’t reach the weight requirement until she was 18 months old but the doctors decided to wait a little longer since Wryn was doing well on dialysis.

“They wanted to wait a little longer because the bigger Wryn was, the better,” Michael told Southern Living.

On July 13, 2017, Wryn and her GiGi had their big day. The Graydon’s kept everyone up to date on their progress via their Facebook Page, Prayers for Wryn Habor Graydon. While Michael and Haley were with Wryn, Michael’s dad was by Carol’s side and sending his son text message updates.

“He was sending me texts, ‘the incision is done. The kidney is out and headed your way,’” Graydon said.

Both made it through the surgery with flying colors. Wryn’s doctor said that transplanted kidney’s usually last about fifteen years. She will most likely need another donor later in life but as of right now, both Wryn and her GiGi are on the path to leading healthy, normal lives.

As soon as Carol was capable, her first request was to go to Wryn’s room and see her grand baby. It’s safe to say these two will have an extra special bond for life.

GiGi sees Wryn for first time since the transplant!! Oh what a special moment!!

Posted by Prayers for Wryn Harbor Graydon on Saturday, July 15, 2017

Carol was able to go home before Wryn and although exhausted, she’s doing very well, the family tells us.

Michael told Southern Living on Monday night that “As of right now everything with the transplant is going amazing she just came down with the common cold Friday and with her immune system being so low it's taken her a while to fight it off.”

Wryn had a fever, which was a minor setback, considering and by Tuesday evening, Wryn Graydon was finally home. Michael took to Facebook again with an emotional update talking about all of the things they can now look forward to for their little girl like bath time, swimming with her 5 year old big sister, going on family vacations and even “breaking curfew.”

Well today is the day we get to go H O M E!! 🏡 It's been 14 days since admission and what a difference these 2 weeks...

Posted by Prayers for Wryn Harbor Graydon on Tuesday, July 25, 2017

We send our prayers and best, healthy wishes for this sweet family. If you would like to help them, you can donate here.