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If you’ve spent most of your life looking for reasons to not make your bed in the morning, we have good news.

Meghan Overdeep
September 26, 2017

If you’ve spent most of your life looking for reasons to not make your bed in the morning, we have good news. Today recently bubbled up an old study reported by the BBC that has us feeling simultaneously creeped out and relieved. In it, scientists found that leaving your bed unmade allows the million-plus dust mites who snuggle up with you every night to die off.

Dust mites and the pesky allergens they produce are everywhere—approximately 1.5 million of them share the sack with you at night. These tiny creatures feed off dead skin cells, and thrive in warm, moist environments like the one your body creates between the sheets. That’s why some experts believe that leaving your bed tousled and messy can kill them off. Sounds like a fair trade, right?

"We know that mites can only survive by taking in water from the atmosphere using small glands on the outside of their body,” Dr. Stephen Pretlove explained to the BBC back in 2005. “Something as simple as leaving a bed unmade during the day can remove moisture from the sheets and mattress so the mites will dehydrate and eventually die."

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But not all scientists agree with Pretlove. Professor Andrew Wardlaw of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology noted that most homes have enough humidity for the bugs to thrive regardless of what state of undress you leave your bed in in the morning.

"I find it hard to believe that simply not making your bed would have any impact on the overall humidity," he said.

While we wait for the scientists to put this debate to bed, we’ll stick to regularly washing our sheets.