Recipe: Grilled Peach Cobbler

There's nothing quite like a helping of warm, gooey peach cobbler topped with some creamy vanilla ice cream. This classic Southern dessert has our hearts for good reason. Cobbler recipes remind us of our grandmothers cooking in the kitchen, using the freshest local produce around – often times from their very own peach trees or blackberry briars. Each Mama has her own special way of preparing this iconic Southern dessert. Although this Grilled Peach Cobbler takes a slightly different approach to the classic recipe, the flavors will remind you of summers at home on Nana's porch. Made in a cast-iron skillet, this cobbler is grilled to perfection until the sides are bubbling and the sweet cobbler topping is perfectly browned. It's the perfect finish to an al fresco dinner with friends, and an even sweeter nightcap following a day at the lake. The key to making this Grilled Peach Cobbler recipe is, without a doubt, using the freshest peaches you can find. If you have a hankering in the winter months, you can substitute frozen peach slices – but using juicy, local peaches at the peak of the season will make this dessert worth the 40-minute cook time.

To start this recipe, fire up the grill. You'll want to heat it up to around medium-high. On a separate work surface, add your peach slices to a large bowl. In a smaller bowl, add your sugar, flour, cinnamon, salt, and nutmeg. Sprinkle your sugar, spice, and everything nice over the peaches, and stir gently. Add this to a buttered, 10-inch cast-iron skillet. Cut 2 tablespoons butter into small pieces over the peaches. Cover your cast iron with foil, and cook for about 15 minutes, or until bubbling. 

It's time for the topping! Add flour, sugar, and baking powder to a small bowl. Make a well in the center, and add cream and melted butter. Stir gently, just until the mixture begins to comes together. Uncover the grill and discard the foil; dollop your bubbling peach mixture with the dough. Grill uncovered until the sweet biscuits are golden-brown – or about 15 minutes.

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